Addictions (written 2018)

13/12/2018 08:29

Addictions. This morning a loved one whose behavior worries me is on my mind. Practice reminds me that the behavior of others is not within my control. I can love, support, care for and about, but I do not make their decisions. Practice also reminds me that addiction, which has its beginnings in the reflexive patterns of habit, is a human tendency. When we do not examine our behaviors, take note of what we do and take note of the consequences of our behavior, then we may fall into patterns that are negative in impact...both for ourselves and others. And so I begin by examining my own addiction to worry.

 

Worry is like riding a stationery bike without even the benefit of burning calories or building stamina and strength. It's a stationary bike with no resistance. The wheels spin in an effortless way, and I sit in the seat pedalling without conscious effort, carried by the momentum of habit. I'm on autopilot and the wheels spin. What happens when I allow this to continue, when no effort is put toward mindfulness? I am carried into a place where worries compound, where my helplessness becomes a painful burden and where I may lash out in anger or despair, or collapse into indifference. Whether it's in response to the behavior of someone I love, or the actions of government, or the vagaries of the weather, worry does not positively impact change.

 

It is useless, however, to tell oneself, or another, not to worry. The only solution is for the worrier to see what is happening and where it's leading. If you've been riding this bike a long time, you have plenty of accumulated experience to examine. Did anything change for the better when you put in enough hours? Did the actions that anger or despair drove you to solve the issue? Did indifference help the situation?

 

Honestly acknowledging the consequences of this addiction allows the possibility of changing the pattern. But it's my pattern. I have to make the changes.

 

This is true too for the loved one I woke thinking of this morning. What positive things can I do to increase the possibility of more awareness on their part? How can I make them feel loved and supported? If they abandon the behavior even for a day, how can I contribute to a sense of goodness in that day, a goodness they will feel? What can I say at the right time, in the right place and in the right words and tone that might open their own awareness even a little, to the behavior that is harming them and negatively impacting their life? These are not easy questions to answer but awareness of them keeps me from behaving impulsively from the roots of my own addiction to worry.

 

This culture both fears and promotes addiction. To substances, to things, to stimulation and variety. We are taught to want more and to want different. Desire in itself is not some kind of evil. But when we believe the story our mind tells us about something else or something more being better, we're set up for addictive behavior. Drinking, over-eating, spending, hopscotching through relationships, and worrying that things won't go the way we want them to.

 

If my own desires were met, all these problems would go away and like the jokes that go around on Face Book, we'd be able to eat what we want without losing our health, drink what we want without being dangerous or foolish, spend what we want without going broke, and love who we want without censure or pain for ourselves or others. And worry would not arise. Yet, it does, and desires are endless. The best way of living with a heart that finds ease, in the world as it is, is to see this truth and to act from goodwill and strong awareness of what the mind is doing.

 

Stepping off my stationary bike for a moment here at least. Finding some space to reflect and abandon my own habitual patterns. Wishing this for my loved one and for all beings.